25 July 2019

eumig Metropolitian CCD (1977) - Rare 3 Head Model

cassette deck
Eumig from Austria was best known for it's filmprojectors, cameras and radios when suddenly in 1977 it introduced it's first compact cassette recorder. It has to be mentioned that they had introduced their proprietary cassette format recorder in 1962, but that model was exclusively made to accompany their film cameras for sincronized sound recording. Now back to this eumig Metropolitan CCD High Concert Fidelity Cassette Deck. The deck features a series of unique solutions and it was awarded with the "Österreichische Staatliche Auszeichnung" and the "Award for Design and Engineering" in Chicago. As a fundamentally new solution to the problems of synchronization, Eumig has introduced the optoelectronic synchronization control for its new cassette drives. Instead of the inertial flywheel, the control is carried out by a so-called "electronic flywheel" with a control sampling frequency of 15000 hertz. The low mass of motor and shaft (less than 2 grams) also explains the extremely short run-up time of less than 1/25 s. The two low-mass bell armature motors are also used for optimal tape winding and as opposite to freewheel control. This also makes possible to switch from one function to another without a stop button. The virtually inertia-free design of the winding motor also makes it possible to use the memory key to control a programmed tape position with great precision, both in fast forward and reverse. 

The head arrangement was also unique. Instead of the usual 3 head sandwiched-head configuration eumig used an independent playback head while the recording head was installed side by side with the erase head which also featured azimuth control with the aid of a built in test tone. The distance between the recording and playback head (sourced from Woelke - Germany) results in an audible time delay of 0.5 seconds when switching from source to tape, which can used for " echo effects " Another interesting feature was the fact that even the tape counter used a gear driven transmission instead of the more common belt drive counters of the era. A relatively small number of 10000 units were made while a slightly different version was used in the eumig Metropolitan CC (Concert Center) that featured added radio and amplifier. 



cassette deck

cassette deck

cassette deck

cassette deck

cassette deck

cassette deck

18 July 2019

REVOX B710 (1981) - Studio Technology For The Living Room

cassette deck

The world had to wait patiently for Studer Revox to develop a cassette recorder but once it was finally launched on the market, the Revox B710 very soon became the market leader. The first Revox cassette recorder was manufactured between 1981 and 1984 and there were two versions of it, MK I and MK II. At the core of the development was a 4 motor drive, that lived up to the high professional demands of the company. The drive worked without belt, friction clutches and mechanical brakes. Instead it had two quartz-synchronised direct drive capstan motors and two take-up motors with optical tacho-generators that also took care of the braking. The complete movement process was controlled by a microprocessor. This resulted in a previously unknown protection for the delicate cassette tape while at the same time achieving record-breaking spooling speeds. This precision drive was later to be built into the professional cassette machines Studer B710 and B710 II.

The amplifier electronics had four Dolby™ B processors. With the MK II version, you could even switch between Dolby™ B and C. That together with the professional 3 head technology (sendust-ferrite), resulted in a perfectly "dolbyised" read-after-write. Two LED chains, each with 24 LEDs was ´built in to give optimal output control. The electronic press button control and an electronic counter with timer function ticked all the boxes when it came to operating the device. In 1981, the Revox B170 was voted "Most outstanding new development of the year" at the Consumer Electronics Show in Los Angeles. Three years later at the same show in 1984, it was again voted "Most outstanding new development of the year in the area of magnetic sound and studio technology".

cassette deck

cassette deck

cassette deck

cassette deck

cassette deck

11 July 2019

JVC DD-V9 (1983) - Closer To The Musical Truth

cassette deck

Superior performance specifications, Special convenience features, Superb sound quality, this is the JVC DD-V9 (Victor DD-V9 in Japan) 3 Head Auto-Reverse cassette deck introduced in 1983. The JVC DD-V9 is the ultimate in convenience and precision - convenience because it records and plays both sides of a tape automatically, and precision because it has three heads. JVC's auto-reverse swivel head features a jewel-lock system (ruby-tipped azimuth adjustment screw) that makes possible to adjust the head alignment for each path of tape travel independently. The three-head design consists of a SA (Sen-Alloy) recording head and a Metaperm playback head, hyperbolically curved for extended bass. During forward play and record, the DD-V9 use a capstan directly driven by compact Pulse Servo motors designed and built by JVC at their own plant. 

The Pulse Servo motor used incorporates a significant amount of technology originally developped for JVC turntables. Technically the motor can be described as a "4-phase, 8-pole, brushless & coreless FG direct-drive motor" The JVC computerized B.E.S.T. (Bias, Equalization, Sensitivity of Tape) tuning system analyzes the electromagnetic properties of any tape and adjusts the deck's electronics for a perfect match - all in about 15 seconds. The fluorescent display will show you remaining tape time in minutes and seconds and various Music Scan modes. The two-colour fluorescent level meters are accurate, easy to read and highly responsive. Each of the bars for the left and right channels consists of 18 segments, and in turn each segment is formed of 20 matrix dots. Less frequently used controls are located on a slide-in/out panel for easier operation and cleaner lines while the optional R-70E wired remote control adds to the list of comfort features.


cassette deck

cassette deck

cassette deck

cassette deck


cassette deck

cassette deck

04 July 2019

40th Anniversary - The Walkman

Walkman

The world first Walkman was introduced on 1st of July 1979. This was the SONY TPS-L2 and was created by the co-founders of SONY, Akio Morita and Masaru Ibuka, with Kozo Ohsone. This was not the first SONY handheld cassette machine but it was the first playback only, dedicated compact cassette music player. (previous models were recorders made for reporters) Even though introduced in 1979 it was only by 1980 that the name Walkman (in Janglish) was first used. Initially the SONY TPS-L2 was sold as "Soundabout" in the US, "Stowaway" in the United Kingdom, and "Freestyle" in Australia. The term "Walkman" eventually made its way into the Oxford English Dictionary in 1986. During it's history a series of "specialized" models were introduced like Sports or high-tech models, slightly thicker then the cassette itself.


Walkman

Walkman

Walkman

Walkman

Walkman

Walkman

Walkman

Walkman

Walkman
The First Walkman Advert